Sardinian pages

YiS Team: Alessandra Vigliotta


Tuesday, April 9th, 2024


Sardinian pages

A trip to the city and villages, a theatre of stories, suggestions, everyday life and memories of the past, told by great island writers (ph. Libro Cucito, by Maria Lai)

Many, in their stories, make it perceived as out of time and space. Sardinia has given, and continues to give, ideas and backgrounds to set exciting events. Myths, legends and traditions intersect with history and current events. Sometimes in well-defined places, often in imaginary countries, even if easily traceable to real locations. To guide in this itinerary are Sergio Atzeni, Giuseppe Dessì, Michela Murgia, Salvatore Satta, Grazia Deledda and Enrico Costa, with their words become immortal in the classics of Sardinian literature.

Read more on Sardegna Turismo: https://www.sardegnaturismo.it/it/pagine-di-sardegna

Vermentino, fragrance of the sea, sun and wind

YiS Team: Annalisa Bucci


Friday, April 5th, 2024


Vermentino, fragrance of the sea, sun and wind

As the northwesterly wind whips across the rugged rocks of Gallura, it is the fresh, lively face of Sardinia at its best.

Intense, with a strong, fragrant and harmonious character. Vermentino embodies the distinctive features of nature and of the identity of Sardinia. When you think about Vermentino, the vineyards on the granite hillsides of Gallura, caressed by the sea breeze, or perhaps the green rows that adorn the rolling landscapes across the rest of the island come to mind. Everywhere, on the land that comes from granite weathering and on the chalky and clay-rich soils, Vermentino is synonymous with full-bodied, elegant wines, with an unmistakable straw yellow colour and a hint of green..

The northeast is the home of Vermentino di Gallura, a DOCG wine, while everywhere else the name becomes Vermentino di Sardegna. The first is made according to stricter rules: at least 95 percent of Vermentino grapes must be produced in Gallura and grown at altitudes not exceeding 500 metres, making the aroma more flavourful and flowery. The second requires that at least 85 percent of Vermentino grapes come exclusively from the Sardinian territory and provides fruitier notes.

80 percent the Vermentino vines grown in Italy are found in Sardinia. Its origin, however, is uncertain and debated: the most probable theory is its arrival in Europe from the Middle East, thanks to the Greeks, who introduced it in Marseilles. From the French city, it spread to Liguria and to Tuscany, reaching Sardinia via Corsica. Here, thanks to constant winds, a mild climate and the rugged ground, Vermentino found its chosen land.

Table wine? Also, but not only: its fresh taste and flowery and fruity flavours make it an excellent aperitif. It is perfect with fish dishes, from seafood starters to pasta and risotto “allo scoglio” or with shellfish and roasted fish. It is also excellent with cheeses, white meats and mushroom-based dishes. It is best as a young wine – one or two years old – and at low temperatures: taste it cool and you will be able to appreciate every note.

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Murats

YiS Team: Annalisa Bucci


Friday, April 5th, 2024


Murats

Arising in the centre of the island is the historical record of Sardinian textile art, in a village on the border between Oristano and Nuoro that have kept the artisan tradition alive.

The acronym stands for Museo Unico Regionale dell’Arte Tessile Sarda – being the Regional Museum of Sardinian Textile Art – and encompasses the value and vision of an institution that, since 2002, has been safeguarding, displaying and promoting the priceless heritage of the island’s manufacturing excellence. The MURATS is located in Samugheo, a village of Mandrolisai – a territory in the ‘heart’ of Sardinia divided between the provinces of Oristano and Nuoro – renowned to this day for its flourishing textile production. The geographic ‘isolation’ of the town meant that a prolific high-quality craft tradition endured, handed down from mother to daughter.

Created thanks to the discovery of artefacts once enclosed within the settlements of the houses in Samugheo and the rest of the island, the exhibition has been set-up throughout more than 750 square metres of a building in the outskirts. It is divided into three rooms, two being on the ground floor where the permanent collection is displayed, and one on the first floor dedicated to temporary exhibitions, which enhance the variety, value and even modernity of the textile art. The permanent collection consists in a body of artefacts in wool, cotton and linen, coming from various parts of the regional territory and created throughout a period of time spanning from the end of the 18th to the second half of the 20th century. The famous Cocco collection is also included. To be admired are blankets, bed sheets, children’s linens and items for everyday use, blanket chest covers, saddlebags, traditional clothing, shepherd’s garments, attire worn by the locals on a daily basis and for festivals, along with the tools used to make them, especially traditional wooden frames. Amongst the most particular items are the affaciadas, tiny finely-worked tapestries that are spread out along the balconies during the corpus domini. Of note due to their rarity and prestige are five 18th-century tapinos ‘e mortu (of twelve found in Sardinia), being carpets on which bodies would be placed during funeral vigils. Discovered in various areas around Sardinia (especially in Orgosolo), they are characterised by bold hues (yellow and black) and by a complex symbology of zoomorphic and anthropomorphic figures that accompanied the deceased on their final journey, discovered in fabrics associated with burials in Anatolia, Peru and Christianised Egypt.

The museum creates a dynamic link between the community, the past, present and new trends. Through exhibitions and events, a cross-section of contemporary art is offered. Accompanying these are the organised workshops, seminars, laboratories, internships and traineeships. During the visit, there will be an educational journey consisting of a weaving trial. The event of the year hosted by MURATS (and Casa Serra in the old town) is Tessingiu, the exhibition of the most anticipated handicraft art in Sardinia, together with the Fiera dell’artigianato artistico di Mogoro that ‘weave’ the strands of know-how on crafts hailing from Sardinian locations that are distant from each other yet united by a common cultural ‘thread’.

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Sardegna, golf & more

YiS Team: Annalisa Bucci


Friday, April 5th, 2024


Sardegna, golf & more

A passion for sport to experience throughout the year in an earthly paradise

A mild climate and warm hospitality, thousands of years of traditions with varied and unparalleled landscapes: this is the setting where the Island’s golf courses are located, places where you can combine a passion for sport with a charming holiday, in elegant environments, with high-quality services, wellness centres and delicious cuisine.

1. The Pevero is everything you could wish for in a day of golf

Golfo del Pevero, Porto Cervo, on the northern coast of the Gallura region, twenty minutes by car from Olbia and a few hours by plane from the major European towns. A unique destination in the heart of the Costa Smeralda, where everything is special and exclusive, starting with the design and the buildings of the Pevero golf club, which is considered one of the most beautiful golf courses in the world: in 1978, it hosted the Italian Open. The 18 holes are located on a natural ‘carpet’ along the coast, with spectacular views: fairways that find their way into the Mediterranean scrub, bunkers that appear on the granite rocks shaped by the wind, and natural pools are the ‘water hazards’ on the course. From the club house, designed in harmony with the natural setting, the view is unforgettable, from the beach of Pevero to Cala di Volpe: the green fields blend with the turquoise sea.

2. Quiet and unspoilt: Is Arenas is a corner of paradise ideal for golf

Winding and undulating green ‘drapery’. The 18 holes of the Is Arenas Country&Golf Club, in the centre of the western coast of Sardinia, a short distance from the beauty of the Sinis peninsula (and twenty kilometres from Oristano), extend for over six kilometres along a coastline of sand dunes shaped by the wind and dotted with pines and junipers. It is a golf course for elegant games and was built in full respect of an 800-hectare wood. You will enjoy absolute tranquillity, a source of inspiration for your strategy and for deciding how to ‘hit’ the ball. Strolling across the course, your experience will be all-engaging, with intense fragrances, shining colours and silence broken only by the twittering of birds and waves breaking on the water’s edge.

3. Is Molas is the largest golf course in Sardinia and is one of the best in Italy

In the Mediterranean, it is known as one of the most technically valid and most spectacular golf courses based on its setting. Prestigious competitions are hosted here, including four Italian Open tournaments and one European Masters tournament. The Is Molas Golf Club in Santa Margherita di Pula is a splendid garden with a sea view, located a few minutes from delightful beaches and from the centre of Pula and approximately 30 kilometres from Cagliari, the capital of Sardinia. It is the largest course on the island: in a setting of palm trees and Mediterranean scrub, it has 27 holes. The nine of the Yellow Course are challenging. The green and the bunkers are American style, while the fairways are large, making them ideal for carrying out slice effects.

4. The Tanka is a ‘gem’ located on the spectacular Villasimius coast

In 2007, it was awarded a prize by The World of Golf magazine, as the best new golf course in Italy and it is located next to beaches and little coves in the marine protected area of Capo Carbonara. The 18-hole golf course of the Tanka Golf Club in Villasimius, a tourism ‘pearl’ in the southeastern part of the Island (45 minutes by car from Cagliari), occupies a surface area of 40 hectares and it is five and a half kilometres long, situated in a breathtaking setting where the salty fragrance coming from the beach of Simius mixes with Mediterranean scents. A course of rare beauty and technically challenging: the first nine holes require a good variety of hits and drives, while the second nine are on a more level surface and allow you to breathe a little. Next to it, there is a practice green, with eight covered posts and fifteen uncovered ones, flanked by a splendid putting green. A spectacular lighting system also makes it possible to compete at night.

5. Puntaldia and Alghero, perceiving the fragrance of the sea breeze on the skin and in the air

A short distance from the splendid beaches of San Teodoro, the Puntaldìa Golf Club blends perfectly with the colours of the landscape and has the impressive outline of the Tavolara Island in the background. The nine-hole golf course is ten kilometres from the residential area of San Teodoro and 25 kilometres from the airport and port of Olbia. It is a paradise-like garden with picturesque bays and coves and lush greenery surrounded by palm trees. Ideal for training, friendly competitions or minor tournaments, it will surprise you with its technical difficulties over a 1800-metre circuit. A driving range and putting green are available, allowing you to complete your golfing experience. From the northeast to the opposite side of Sardinia. The group of golfers from the ASD Golf Club Alghero organizes tournaments and events in a 9-hole pitch and putt golf course (plus a practice green), with the same difficulties as the regulation courses: it is located just over a kilometre from the splendid sea of the famous Catalan town of Alghero.

6. Cagliari and its surrounding area, where nature and silence prevail

There are two golfing centres in the vicinity of the Island’s capital city: Sa Tanca Golf Club in Flumini, a district of Quartu Sant’Elena, along the western stretch of the Golfo degli Angeli (15 minutes by car from Cagliari) and the Ercole Cellino Golf&Country Club, just outside the residential area of Assemini, a little town five minutes by car from the airport of Elmas and ten from Cagliari. Both golf courses have nine holes and are examples of good taste and functionality, as well as a combination of tradition and innovation in the supporting buildings. A few tens of kilometres from breathtaking beaches, in a green oasis, you will find: challenging fairways and fast greens, small bodies of water and trees.

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Destinations: Rena Majori

YiS Team: Annalisa Bucci


Friday, April 5th, 2024


Destinations: Rena Majori

In the far northern most tip of Sardinia there is an uncommonly beautiful large beach of white, soft sand, crystal clear water and colourful sea beds, making it one of the top destinations in Gallura, and not by coincidence used for several advertising campaigns.

Beyond a shady pine forest, walking through dense juniper bushes, you’ll come upon the brightly coloured countryside of Rena Majori, a strip of white, incredibly find sand that slips into an enchanting coloured sea, bordered by dark rocks and light granite. In the area of almost the same name, Rena Majore, in the territory of Aglientu, is part of the natural site of Monti Russu.

The sea, made of light and dark brush marks of blue, acts as a “magnet” for children with its rocks and small pools. As well as having a gently sloping gradient perfect for less expert swimmers, the sea bed at Rena Majori, with its bright colours and full of fish, is a favourite with divers and snorkelers.

The coastline is broken by the mouths of the Rio Cantaru and the RiuoCiuchesa, which “cut” the strip of sand into three parts, making the shore even more suggestive. It is rarely crowded and has been used for several advertising campaigns, including one with Australian actress and model Megan Gale. Behind the beach, a vast pine forest shelters you from the wind and offers a relaxing refuge on hot days. For the more romantic, don’t miss a long walk on the beach during a spectacular sunsets. A large car park, campsites and beach equipment for hire complete the scene.

Rena Majori is only eight kilometres from Santa Teresa Gallura and its “town” paradise Rena Bianca, a 700 metre cove with shallow water and soft, white sand, a clear sea with stunning colours. On the way out of town, before arriving at Rena Majore, you’ll come to the peninsula-promontory of Capo Testa, joined to the mainland by a strip of sand that forms two beaches – Rena di Ponente (or Taltana) and Rena di Levante – and the spectacular Valle della Luna and Cala Grande. Continuing along the shore towards Aglientu, you’ll find the rocky coves of Santa Reparata and the enchanting Lu Pultiddolu.

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Destinations: Oasi di Bidderosa

YiS Team: Annalisa Bucci


Friday, April 5th, 2024


Destinations: Oasi di Bidderosa

Five coves of soft, white sand looking out onto the emerald green sea, in a park of unspoilt nature: an unparalleled oasis in the northern part of the Gulf of Orosei, on the eastern coast of Sardinia.

The dazzling white sand will suddenly appear before your eyes at the end of a long road bordered by junipers, pines and holm oaks. Although the sensation is that of being in a different world, this place really exists and it is the oasis of Bidderosa: five dreamy little coves inside a park of 860 hectares, mostly formed by woods and Mediterranean scrub, protected by the Forest Authority and entrusted to the Municipality of Orosei, which is 13 kilometres north of here. Access by car or motorbike is limited to a restricted number from May until the end of October. There are no seasonal limits if you enter by bike or on foot, although you must respect the rules regarding preservation of this quiet place set in greenery. By going on a trekking trip, you can delve deep into the reserve: you will admire the rolling greenery, artistic granite elevations and centuries-old junipers standing on the white shorelines. Otherwise, you can get there via a short swim in the sea from the adjoining Cala Ginepro (to the south): during low tide, the water is one metre deep. The first beach in the oasis is four kilometres from the entrance and you will gradually find the other four, all approximately one kilometre long, stretching as far as the northern border, represented by another picture postcard paradise: the splendid beach of Bèrchida, in the territory of Siniscola.

Fine white sand, sea daffodils and granite rocks appear, characterizing the five coves: a charming and silent landscape, filled with the fragrance of the vegetation and washed by the crystal clear sea, with its shallow waters. You can swim and do some snorkelling here, in waters with a constant depth even several tens of metres from the shore. Also in the oasis, there is Monte Tuttavista, covered in cork oaks and holm oaks, Fuile ‘e Mare and Senna ‘e Sachita, covered in Aleppo pines and stone pines, where you will find picnic tables and relax in the most sweltering hours. Eucalyptus trees, junipers and Mediterranean species will welcome you at the end of the dirt trail providing access to the coves, that winds through the pine forest and alongside the lagoon of Sa Curcurica (meaning pumpkin), populated by non-migratory and migratory birds, which you can observe from the bird-watching locations. Next to it, stands Monte Urcatu: from the summit, you will see kilometres of orderly trails and clean beaches. Bidderosa is the pearl of Orosei, a renowned tourist centre with heavenly beaches, among which Cala LiberottoCala GineproMarina di Orosei and Cala Osalla, on the Dorgali border.

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Destinations: Cala Domestica

YiS Team: Annalisa Bucci


Wednesday, April 3rd, 2024


Destinations: Cala Domestica

On the south-west coast of Sardinia, on the border with Sulcis, there is a splendid bay framed by high cliffs overlooked by a Spanish tower, where a history of mining and uncontaminated nature blend in a single landscape.

Up until 1940, minerals were mined and loaded onto ships here. Like an authentic open-air industrial museum, CalaDomestica, two kilometres south of Buggerru, still preserves the ruins of warehouses, deposits and tunnels dug by the miners. One of these to the right of the cala leads to a second, hidden, almost intimate cove known as La Caletta.

The larger cove is a deep and stunning inlet, almost a fjord, with a wide, sheltered beach with soft, compact sand that ranges from white to amber and gold. Small Mediterranean bushes dot the dunes behind the stretch of sand. In front, there is one of the most beautiful, turquoise and azure seas of Sardinia.

The impressive, white, calcareous cliffs that surround the beach make it feel like you’re in a corner of paradise, where uncontaminated nature rules. The seabed is low and sandy, with a few rocks out to sea near the promontories. You won’t hesitate to pull on a mask and dive in to admire the extraordinary submarine world, with a huge variety of fish swimming in the crystalline water. It is no coincidence that it is particularly popular with underwater fishing enthusiasts. CalaDomestica has a large car-park, camper van area, picnic area, access boardwalk and campsite. It is overlooked by a 18th century Spanish tower about 10 metres high, from which you can admire an unequalled panorama: climb up to the promontory on the left of the coast by following the path leading up from the beach. The tower was used in the 20th century as a second war’s watchtower.

You’ll be fascinated by several stretches of the surrounding coastline: to the right of the modern tourist port near the town centre, you’ll find Buggerru beach, with its find, soft sand opening onto a limpid, azure sea (which has received awards from Legambiente and the Touring Club). The town is built on an old mining village, dating to 1864, overlooked by the exit of the Galleria Henry, a modern-day tourist attraction that once had a steam train running through it to carry the minerals extracted. To the north of the town you’ll find the sandy dunes of San Nicolao, behind which is a dense pine wood, the perfect place for a mountain bike excursion.

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Lighthouse keepers, a story set on the edges of Sardinia

YiS Team: Annalisa Bucci


Wednesday, April 3rd, 2024


Lighthouse keepers, a story set on the edges of Sardinia

“The voice of the wind and the sea could rise or fall, but it never stopped”. The echo of wild cliffs resounds in the journals of the keepers, where the only sign of life and hope is the beam of the lighthouse.

A beam of light keeps night sailors away from the coasts, signalling the last boundary between land and sea. During the day, with the light off, the charm of lost and wild places shines in its stead. Standing on headlands far from everything and on uninhabited islands, the lighthouses of Sardinia are lonely outposts, silent witnesses of the stories of the sea. They watch over bright-coloured waters, where the air smells of salt and Mediterranean scents and the hubbub of waves crashing on the rocks is incessant. They exude the emotions and feelings of the intense lives of their keepers, of yesterday and today. They tell of miraculous rescues and shipwrecks, of boats swallowed by the waves, as in the islet of Mangiabarche (boat-eater), only a short distance from the coast of Calasetta, on the island of Sant’Antioco, named for its reputation among sailors. Nearby, on the island of San PietroCapo Sandalo stands on a cliff overlooking the westernmost lighthouse in Italy, built in 1864. From its summit, at the top of 124 spiral steps, it emits four beams of light that reach up to 24 miles away.

Life in solitude on the lighthouses became tragic when endless storms raged that cut off the islets inhabited only by the keepers and their families. They are very close to the mainland, yet they must have appeared far away, waiting for help that was delayed. This was often the case at dei Cavoli island, a short distance from Villasimius. Today, only memories remain of families and keepers drowned in a desperate attempt to escape. Cavoli lighthouse is now home to the biological research center of the protected area of ​​Capo Carbonara and is one of the most visited places in the marine park. Built in the mid-19th century, the lighthouse incorporates a late-16th century Spanish tower. Its outer walls are covered with a mosaic of small white tesserae, with colours changing from blue to purple. Moving up the eastern coast, you will meet the splendid and endless sandy expanse of Costa Rei, closed to the north by the promontory of Capo Ferrato. It starts with delightful coves, and leads, at the end of a path through thick Mediterranean scrub, to a striking 11 metre high lighthouse tower. Further east, across the Gulf of Orosei, in Siniscola you will discover another ‘mythical’ lighthouse, which has stood at the eastern end of the splendid Capo Comino beach since 1903.

On the oldest of the Sardinian lighthouses, at Razzoli, the northernmost island of the Maddalena archipelago park, the keepers lived like hermits. The great light guarding the tormented Bocche di Bonifacio required the work of three keepers, who lived here with their families sharing everything they had, even the education of their children. Their teachers reported to the mainland on the lives of the children and teenagers who grew up on the small island exposed to the elements. Emotions experienced at the edge of the world, the same that you can still feel when visiting other (former) lighthouses of the archipelago and the opposite coast: Punta Filetto and the lookout of Marginetto at La Maddalena; the lighthouse of Capo d’Orso in Palau, the signalling stations of Capo Ferro in Porto Cervo and Punta Falcone in Santa Teresa Gallura, where the magic of the Capo Testa lighthouse stands out as a romantic destination and a meditative refuge, not to say a reference point for surfers (since 1845) and anyone seeking a place to sit quietly and reflect. Still in Gallura, at Golfo Aranci, a path towards the peak of Capo Figari leads to the Navy lighthouse. Completed in 1890, it became famous thanks to Guglielmo Marconi who installed a (then) revolutionary shortwave radio system.

Solitude and silence. The Sinis peninsula ‘speaks’ through the signs of nature and ancient history. It extends by land and sea from the lighthouse of Capo Mannu to that of Capo San Marco, which you can reach on foot along a path that passes by the ruins of Tharros. The two ends mark the edges of the Sinis protected marine area, which has survived intact to the modern day: sand dunes, white cliffs, quartz crystal beaches, natural oases inhabited by rare fauna and scattered with evidence of the Nuragic, Phoenician Punic and Roman ages. It is an extraordinary piece of land, like the widow of the lighthouse keeper of Capo San Marco. Her love for her husband and her passion for her job led her to become a keeper herself and raise her children in the lighthouse. One of them is today the last keeper. Guarding the extreme south of Sardinia is one of the oldest island lighthouses, built in 1850: the lighthouse of Sant’Elia, near the bay of Calamosca. The lighthouse is a two-storey building topped by a cylindrical tower with black and white stripes. Its light expands up to 21 miles, guiding the path of ships and boats in the Golfo degli Angeli. It also watches over an open-air museum: in a few square kilometres on the hill you’ll find a concentration of Roman cisterns, ancient mosaics, steps carved into the rock and a domu de Janas adapted to civil uses.

Contemplation, restlessness, suggestion, wonder…this is the Asinara park. Just like every island, it has its own lighthouse, standing alone at its northern end. Even the name is ‘sinister – Punta Scorno. Set in the open sea, it is exposed to storms. A round three-storey tower, 35 metres high, dating back to the mid-19th century, dominates from above the rarely tranquil ‘palette’ of blue, azure, turquoise and green. Stories about the lighthouse abound: the most famous is the story of the three Vitello sisters, daughters of a lighthouse keeper. One night in September 1953 they rescued three survivors, recovering them with a small boat. Their courage earned them a bronze medal from the Italian Navy, the only women to receive the honour. In 1977 the last lighthouse keeper closed the wooden door of the lighthouse for the last time. Since then it has been automated, but still remains witness to the total isolation of Asinara. Before becoming a park, it was a hospital, a penal colony, a war refuge, and a maximum security prison – the Italian Alcatraz. For decades, the life of the keepers, in the village of Cala d’Oliva, went hand in hand with that of prison guards and prisoners. In fact, one of the prisoners used to be assigned to help the lighthouse keeper during the day – in exchange he lived in semi-freedom, together with the keeper’s family.

Sardegna Turismo
 
 
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Great beauty travels on the Green train

YiS Team: Alessandra Vigliotta


Wednesday, December 6th, 2023


Great beauty travels on the Green train

On the tracks of the historic Sardinian railways time passes by slowly. Fairy-tale landscapes flow past the windows, in a unique experience that offers the perfect introduction to the most intimate and profound aspects of the island.

“At the end of a long climb, we reach a station after a stretch of solitude. Each time, it seems that nothing lies ahead, nothing is inhabited. And every time, we pull into a station.” This is the poetic description, aboard the locomotive that is today the Trenino Verde (Green Train) of Sea and Sardinia, the project dedicated by David Herbert Lawrence on his 1921 voyage to Sardinia. Following in his footsteps a century later, travellers from all over the world are attracted to this unique railway line, derived from the ‘old components’, designed and constructed between the late 19th and early-20th centuries. An Italian excellence, a unique experience comprised of four trails totalling 437 kilometres, with three sections having been operating non-stop for 130 years, including engineering and architectural works, such as bridges and tunnels. The lines, never abandoned, have been preserved and protected, connecting the coasts and hinterland, integrating such with excursions to the lakes by boat, trekking, cycling and horse riding. You can hop on the on any of the seasonal calendar days or hire it out for a group excursion – thanks to the initiative Su Trenu Antigu, aimed at enthusiasts, schools and tour operators, for an exclusive railway line!

At a leisurely pace, the locomotive glides smoothly along the rails, in the midst of lush forests, ‘choo-chooing’ along between corridors of rocks, olive groves and mastic trees, climbing with much effort to the peaks of reliefs. The sun illuminates the wooden details, the window frames glimmering, framed with damask curtains. In the early 20th century, social gatherings on wheels moved like those of elegant and distinguished society. Within, the luxury is from another era – red velvet lounges run along a corridor lit by yellow-tone ceiling lights. The on-board excursions will titillate all of the senses through the landscapes, scents and silences. There is Mandas, a medieval village in Trexenta with a glorious past, today an important cultural hub, with trains heading in two directions. The first and historical line originally reached Sorgono. Today, it crosses the Sarcidano sub-region, passing the Giara di Serri, a town famed for its Santuario Nuragico di Santa Vittoria, the shores of Lago San Sebastiano and the hills of Isili, the ‘copper town’. After having passed through lush the countryside of Nurallao, it rises up to Laconi, a village famous for Sant’Ignazio, for its castle and Marquis garden Aymerich and for its menhirs, safeguarded in the Menhir Museum – the Museo della Statuaria Preistorica Sarda. Today, it is the end of the line, completing the pathway that crosses the historic region of Barbagia di Belvì and Mandrolisai, rising up almost 900 metres.

The second Mandas line reaches Sadali, crossing much of Sarcidano and the Barbagia di Seulo historical region. On the way, you will see the villages of OrroliNurriVillanova Tulo and the hamlets of Palarana and Betilli, flanking the Lago di Flumendosa, crossed by boats in Mississippi style. A resplendent landscape of water and Nuragic structures, it is dominated by karst phenomena, such as the Grotta Is Janas, waterfalls like su Stampu de su Turrunu, and prehistoric monuments like the Nuraghe Arrubiu. Prior to the final station of Sadali-Seulo, pass by Esterzili, a mural town at 700 metres above sea level, famous for the Nuragic Temple Domu de Orgia and a bronze tablet with Roman inscriptions. From June to early September, the train toots along each weekend, also travelling the Ogliastra route. The Eastern course departs from the port of Arbatax, in the beautiful tourist resort of Tortolì. Stops along the way include the high-up stations of IlbonoElini, Arzana, Lanusei and Villagrande Strisaili, passing through enchanting panoramas like the forests of Santa Barbara and Selene. The terminus is in the depths of Ogliastra, in Gairo Sant’Elena, the town that has lived twice, with the present one having been built in the mid-20th century further upstream, following a flood that destroyed the old Gairo that is presently a ghost town.

Granite landscapes modelled by the wind and a stretch of wild olive trees, cork oaks and vineyards of vermentino vines as far as the eye can see. This is the quaint and profound Gallura traversed by train. The journey commences in Tempio, on the slopes of Monte Limbara, a gracious town rich in springs and home to the island’s most famous allegorical Carnival. The spectacle of nature change colour continuously along the journey. The locomotive stops in villages overlooking the Lago di Liscia, festooned with tourist boats. The locomotive stops in villages overlooking the Lago di Liscia, festooned with tourist boats. The train tracks run just a short distance from the coast, the line crossing the valley of Calangianus, capital of cork, then Nuchis and Luras, a town of prehistoric dolmen and thousand-year-old olive trees, including the ‘patriarch’ of Europe. From the Sant’Antonio di Gallura station, you will glimpse the geometric Arzachena countryside, its landscape threaded with vineyards. The old village station hosts a small museum. Looking out of the azure window of the terminus, Palau, famous for its beaches, military forts, the Roccia dell’Orso and the ‘gateway’ to the La Maddalena Archipelago National Park. The north-western line currently departs from Santa Maria di Corte, in the territory of Sindia, a flourishing town during medieval times built around a Benedictine monastery. After crossing the Planargia sub-region, the train reaches Bosa Marina, a coastal area in one of the most enchanting Sardinian villages, Bosa, its multicoloured houses rising up a hill dominated by the Castello di Serravalle, reflected on the Temo river. Along the way, you’ll discover FlussioTinnuraTresnuraghes and Modolo, famous for the malvasia grape variety, asphodel baskets and precious fabrics.

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The tradition is looking to the future

YiS Team: Alessandra Vigliotta


Wednesday, December 6th, 2023


The tradition is looking to the future

The starting point is curiosity: observing them, listening to them, mothers and grandmothers carefully choosing the ingredients, showing off their skills and performing almost ritual gestures, while patiently explaining the various steps in just a few words. Then comes the passion, the tenacity, the desire to experiment, starting by repeating what was learned and adding just the right amount of imagination. Sardinian traditional cuisine, with its distinctive local qualities providing unique sensations and flavours, takes on a new character in the third millennium: that given by the new generation of brave and talented chefs.

There are only two binding principles, namely respect for the patrimony of knowledge handed down from generation to generation and the local products. Solid, healthy foundations that have helped put several areas of Sardinia in the blue zone, the land of lively, active centenarians. As well as the inescapable typical restaurants, trattorias and farmhouses – foundations of the ‘historical’ dishes of local cuisine – there are the chefs, more or less young ones, often with a wealth of prestigious experience in kitchen teams throughout the world. Their challenge? Returning home to honour Sardinia in the world of excellent food, rethinking the culinary tradition of a unique land.

Sustainability, local products – grown in their own vegetable gardens or supplied by producers just around the corner -, rediscovering forgotten ingredients, particularly cereals, legumes and wild herbs, innovative cooking techniques, the evolution of forms and textures – such as tartare and finger food -, the influence of exotic cultures: these are the elements that characterise the nouvelle vague of Sardinian cuisine. It is a cuisine in which the concept of the customer has evolved, becoming no longer just a consumer of delicious dishes, but a guest pampered and accompanied through an experience that can excite and titillate all the senses.

The results? Every year, Sardinian restaurants are increasingly recognised, mentioned and included in the most prestigious international culinary guides, such as the Michelin Guide and the Gambero Rosso, and in specialised magazine articles all over the world. Such goals are also achieved by pizzerias, pastry shops, bakeries and ice cream parlours. Research and innovation also characterise the wineries, with the rediscovery of almost forgotten vines and the enhancement of wine varieties of the past, the production of liqueurs and spirits made from spontaneous herbs and fruits and the increasing number of craft breweries. Eating and drinking well go hand in hand and always find the right combinations and the best and sometimes daring ways of complimenting each other, resulting in unforgettable sensations to experience in every corner of the island.

Sardegna Turismo
 
 
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